2020-40-under-40-Ryan-Case | Automotive News

Management retention is key to operational success, customer retention, business growth and associate morale, says Ryan Case, national parts and service director and corporate facility director at Rick Case Automotive Group.
 
Case began serving in various fixed ops, service, parts, F&I and used-car roles at Rick Case 15 years ago. He was promoted to parts and service director of the Sunrise, Fla., group in 2017.

He has lived by his motto of retention and growth since he has been involved with the group.
   
Case joined Rick Case after exploring a variety of nonautomotive-related fields, including culinary arts. He now hopes to continue his career at the dealership group and eventually succeed his parents as the dealer operator.
 
“I’ve always had a passion for the fixed side,” Case told Automotive News. “That’s where all the customer retention is.”
 
In addition to his current parts and service responsibilities, Case supervises facility expansion and new construction projects. The group ranked No. 35 on the Automotive News 2020 list of the Top 150 Dealership Groups, with sales of 41,379 vehicles last year, and owns 17 dealerships in Cleveland, Atlanta and South Florida.
 
Using his degrees from Northwood University in dealership operations and from the NADA Dealer Academy in general dealership management, Case has prioritized retention, profits and the customer service experience throughout his three years as director.
 
In 2019, the group saw 100 percent retention across its parts and service management positions. He credits that to “letting people feel like they’re making a difference and growing in their department, and [showing] you’re engaged with them and care about them.”
 
Also under Case, 14 of the group’s parts and service departments achieved a gross profit record in 2019. Net profit for the parts and service departments for the entire auto group in 2019 was up 22.5 percent over 2018, a $4 million net profit increase.

“One of the things I’ve been preaching to everybody is to slow down,” Case said. “Everybody’s in such a rush. Society is in such a rush.
“I think getting everybody to slow down a little bit and just listen has been a big part of our growth.”

— Alexa St. John